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German Shorthaired Pointer

The German Shorthaired Pointer (GSP) was first recognised in the 1800s being bred by German Hunters from several breeds including the Spanish and English Pointer, Hanovarian Bloodhound and the English Foxhound. It is this interjection of Foxhound which probably gave the GSP its incredible stamina and its hound like voice. The GSP was bred to bring track injured game such as wild boar and deer, bring them down and then keep guard until the hunter caught up with his kill. This guarding instinct can still be witnessed in todays GSP, and in German Field Trials GSPs are still required to show their strength and stamina by retrieving foxes over five bar gates.

The GSP can be liver and white or black and white, or solid liver or black. GSPs are affectionate and very loyal, they are energetic and can be boisterous. They require lots of mental stimulation but are eager to please during training. A fairly complex breed that need careful handling to prevent nervousness on one hand or a please themselves attitude on the other.

Whilst hunting they cover large areas of open ground with speed and enthusiasm. But will also adapt well to hunting in woodland, they make excellent stalking and falconry dogs. GSPs are often described as the true versatile gundog, with much care during early training they will be careful retrievers, but are not the happiest of peg dogs, prefering to be a roughshooters companion and use their abilities as hunter, pointer and retriever.

They do not like to be left for long periods by themselves. They love to dig, and are sure to perform a garden makeover if given the opportunity.

In the show ring, their clean muscular outline make them an attractive breed to show. However their thirst for activity means they are much happier if they can combine a show career with a working one.

More information on the breed can be found on the Kennel Club website

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