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Field Spaniels
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Field Spaniels

The Field Spaniel shares its early history with the Cocker Spaniel, not being recognised as a separate breed until the 1800's. Despite an almost disastrous decline in popularity in the 1900's, numbers have now increased. It is an able hunter and is happiest when it has a job to do.Twice, the breed nearly disappeared, firstly when fashion fads all but ruined the breed in the early 1900s and, secondly, when in the 1950s breed numbers were so small that the Kennel Club withdrew championship status, this being restored in 1969 only after determined efforts by breeders to maintain the breed.

While the Field Spaniel is still not a popular breed by modern standards, he nevertheless makes a good companion for the country dweller. However, note the very definite statement that his devotees have written into his breed standard to the effect that he is not suitable for the city.


The Field Spaniel gait should be long and unhurried, with drive from the rear. It?s coat is long and flat, silky in texture and is both dense and waterproof. The general appearance of the Field Spaniel should be one of a well balanced, noble, upstanding sporting Spaniel, built for activity and endurance.

More information on the breed can be found on the Kennel Club website

In addition there is the Field Spaniel Society

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